Thursday, September 24, 2015

A five block walk



O world, O life, O time. This property rests only a jog away from my house -- three blocks west, two blocks north, one block cross. Might just as well be a continent away.



Some living in the brown might resent all the green. I don't. I'd give every bucket of my shower water to keep it looking thus. Seriously -- I don't wish brown upon this family, I just wish they'd invite me over for cocktails.

On the same block, we have a reality check.



Not that the that is better than the this, except, well, that it is.

In spite of what you may read, SoCal is not a desert climate, we're a Mediterranean climate. Or we were. Something we share with Central Chile, Southern Australia, South Africa, and the obvious. But currently, we're thirsty.

As we're living high and dry, here are some of my Altadena favorites, playing by the rules.







:

28 comments:

  1. Whoever planted all of those drought tolerant mounds must of hit the pic and save section... In a few months they may be ripping those suckers out... I must admit my lawns (back and front) are doing well.. watering twice a day, 2x a week and w/a change in sprinkler heads, things are GREEN... thank God for the gardener who knows what sprinkler heads to use!.did u know there are specific ones to use for the corners of the lawn?

    ReplyDelete
  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Someone was watching you in photo no. 6.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry, I meant Eichler. ---Park Planned Homes?

      Delete
    2. Don't know. It's not on the Park Planned Homes block. I'll ask the owner.

      Delete
  4. Here in Bavaria there's lots I miss ahout the Denas, but not the long, hot, months of brown. There's a lot of green here, and our lawn is growing far too quickly because we haven't figured out how to use the lawn mower yet. You must be longing for the first real rains. The garden in your first photo is truly a refreshing feast for the eyes.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Yeah, it's a purdy place. At around 3 or 4 acres, it's like a Huntington mini-me.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The first place must have (or be) some gardener to keep things looking like that. We haven't had more than an inch of rain in all of August and September, and I must admit that it's getting to be a brownish-green around here. And I'm crap at remembering to water the lawn. Those are surprisingly green yards you found.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Sweet, I particularly enjoy the penultimate photo,--and the last, of course

    ReplyDelete
  8. Given the price of our water, Marjie, I'm guessing the owners aren't WalMart greeters. Maybe something in either the entertainment or dental industry.

    Quite fond of the last myself, Des. And it looks better with every passing month -- which isn't easy, considering we're scratching our way out of what we hope has been our driest summer.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I rather fancy the cottage with all the trees. In our own front, I must admit that it is far more interesting from having ripped out the dull old lawn and putting in natives and other drought tolerant stuff. Also more lizards, hummingbirds and assorted insects.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I like the second one for the abundant citrus and the last for the splashes of red. Here we don't know what "really dry" means - if we go ten days without rain people say it's dry. I think there are those people who embrace the desert landscape. I am not one of those but I do appreciate when people are able to create beauty in their natural environment.

    ReplyDelete
  11. In my neighborhood people are so good at saving water that the trees are starting to die. Too are coming down in near future. Giant pines.

    ReplyDelete
  12. We are ..... finally .... enjoying a late bit of september sunshine in London town after a summer washout so I only feel cactus envy!!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Here is why this breaks my heart: we were approved for the turf removal program. But the deal is you have to shell out the money for the work, it can take months to get your reimbursement AND there's no guarantee you'll be reimbursed at all. So we have to pass.

    Our yard is a disaster of weeds. John says he likes it "fuzzy." I'm just sad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. go to the Theodore Payne Nursery in October and buy a bunch of Salvias, Buckwheat and Sages. It's the time to plant them and with the big rains coming they'll thrive. Plus they get big (believe the labels). Also dig up some grass area and throw wildflower seeds into it. The seeds aren't a permanent solution but you'll be delighted by a field of wildflowers.

      Delete
  14. I recognize the parrot green house. It's on the other side of your street.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Doris, your garden is beautiful. And I referred the owners of garden #5 (when they had dull lawn) to your landscaper, and, voila!
    Petrea, I didn't go the Doris/Des route ($$$), but the woman who supervised my turf removal did a great job for $. Let me know if you want to talk to her.
    PA, good advice. But I have so many plants surrounding the chips, that I'm just planning on a few Russian sage.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I'm a tree person, too. I love photo #2.

    There's a real irony in this drought. Mature trees that never needed watering before are dying because the water table is too low now for their roots to reach. They need to be watered - for the first time in ages, if ever, just when we have less water to do it. Arborists recommend putting a soaker hose around the drip line - about as far out as the branches reach - and running it for about 8 hours, about every 3 weeks.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Beautiful gardens and houses, Karin!
    I agree with Bellis, someone with a stripe shirt was watching you in photo nº. 6.
    I like the tufts of green vegetation on the garden, in photo nº 4 and I like the photo nº 7 too.

    ReplyDelete
  18. No 6 looks like an Eichler to me. Where I grew up we had a couple of Eichler developments. Back in the 60s, they were relatively inexpensive housing. Now they are considered a big deal in spite of some of their problems.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Just a couple of ideas-
    *Buy up green paint and spray the lawn. All year!
    *No lawn... just plants.
    *Buy stock in concrete companies.
    *Build bigger houses... less lawn.
    *Say the hell with it and just let the brush take over!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Interesting photos - and sobering. Especially hard about old trees that are dying because their roots can no longer reach the water table.

    ReplyDelete
  21. The synthetic turf industry here boomed during/after our last major drought. Part of me thinks it's weird, and part of me loves that it's green no matter what. I especially love No.4 ...

    ReplyDelete
  22. My post disappeared while I was writing it. I hope it shows up and makes sense....

    ReplyDelete