Sunday, July 26, 2015

Preserving the Evanston Inn



Buildings of historic significance can disappear in the blink of an eye. Which is why some friends and I expected the worst for the Evanston Inn, teetering and tottering, after years of neglect, on Marengo and Del Mar. We expected it would be razed, replaced by a tri-story concrete/steel condo, painted in various shades of baby diarrhea and spit-up. (Nothing against baby gastric-intestinal offerings, but why does New Pasadena love this palette?)

Whatever. Here's where we stand.



The Evanston Inn, of the distant past, circa 1890.



2013.



2014.



2015.



And future.

27 comments:

  1. From the photo, it looks like they will preserve the old building and add another building in the same architectural style. Do you have any reports from the Design Commission? Looks like it's already a done deal.

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  2. I have dibs on the top room on the left.

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  3. I'm so impressed with what they're doing. The construction isn't destroying the building; at this point, they are raising the foundation. It's quite impressive. You should take a visit.

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  4. Don't know how this happened, but it looks to be a good thing.

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  5. I agree. (Hands off that room, Earl.)

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  6. This sounds like good news. Preservation instead of demolition always gets my vote. Hotel or condos?

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  7. I drive by relatively often, and for a while I was pretty worried about the place. But this is looking fine. Except maybe the baby diarrhea but you can't have everything. And what do I want, anyway, purple?

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    1. Took me a minute to grasp your comment, but after looking at the future, I get it. And you're right, can't have everything. But we're getting more than we expected.

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  8. I lived there when I was in college.

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  9. Now that looks as if it will be a happy ending to the story. I'm a bit surprised!

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  10. I'm surprised, too! I had this whole conspiracy theory that the owners were letting the building deteriorate so they could destroy it without plowing through a Pas History Assoc lawsuit. Sometimes it's ever so good when I'm wrong.

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  11. Wow! Someone is actually doing the right thing! I think the yellow color will be nice. And, no, it isn't the same shade as baby diarrhea; trust me on that issue.

    Here in Scranton, people are saving and repurposing a lot of old buildings; it maintains the character of the place. I'm glad someone in Pasadena has had this idea, too.

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    1. I defer to you in all matters related to babies and grand old houses.

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  12. Looking very nice. I love old buildings, even if the colors change with the times.

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  13. The Evanston Inn looks beautiful and I like the architecture style. Preservation sounds a good news!

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  14. Wow from '13-'14, what a drop off. I guess a illness can came on fast. Its plywood 'eyes' is a sure sign of being on life support. Saving it is a noble idea.

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  15. I'm part of the development team and I can assure you that the Evanston Inn will be rehabilitated and incorporated into a beautiful new 24-unit residential condominium development called Evanston Court. You can see a video fly through and register on our interest list to get occasional updates at www.evanstoncourt.com

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  16. re: "why does New Pasadena love this palette?"

    It's because all those condos they're flooding the market with quote mid-century modern (something the bearded tattood house flipping set can't get enough of.) This color scheme seems to be more of a buttermilk yellow which is appropriate to that period of architecture.

    I say yay for re-use rather then abuse! good job Tim Bales. Now can you do something about the monstrosity they're building behind the Castle Green?

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  17. Yep, my color-complaints in the post were directed towards the concrete blocks. Well done Tim & Co for saving this lovely piece of Pasadena history. If you read the comments, you'll see high-fives from all quarters.

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  18. Tim forgot (in his excitement at your interest in the project, no doubt!) to mention they have a Facebook page with some videos and other good stuff: https://www.facebook.com/evanstoncourt

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  19. That's great that it will not be demolished, but saved in a sensitive way!

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  20. My friend Elena and I visited yesterday. Major effort underway. The inn has been lifted about six or eight feet off the ground in some areas as they work on the foundation. How is that possible? I'm in awe of engineers.

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  21. I happen to pass by the Inn a few days. (Btw, sounds like maybe u need to hang out where the engineers are!)

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