Sunday, June 21, 2015

Oh, you dads


Happy Father's Day. My dad's on the left; a photo taken in 1942. He was about 20 years old, and in the Norwegian underground.

25 comments:

  1. He was a handsome devil!!! Norwegian underground???

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  2. Yes. And my mother's father was part of this, also.

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  3. Good looking young man, for sure. A philanthropist we know, Raymond Sackler, gives money to Norwegian projects to honor their courageous stand in WWII. Did your Dad ever tell you about his exploits?

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  4. A handsome devil, indeed! I was confused about the Norwegian Underground until I re-read the date. Nice tribute.

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  5. You did read "Out Stealing Horses," didn't you? You must.

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  6. By the way: what a brave young man he was.

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  7. He told us little, but we never asked. Oh, it seemed so long ago. Of course, now I have the questions.

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    1. I feel the same way about my dad. He didn't talk about it then, and now I have the questions.

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    2. Which is why storycorp is such a brilliant concept.

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  8. I wonder if any of his company left memoirs.

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    1. If they did, I unfortunately don't know their names. My godfather, Uncle Fred, was an American, and a part of the Normandie invasion. Occasionally, they'd discuss their exploits over a bottle of scotch. Why didn't I listen?

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  9. Happy Father's Day!
    He was a handsome young man indeed!

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  10. Men of that generation had a stiff code of honor and held secrets secure, even later. My father, an engineer at Bell Labs, made lots of trips to Los Alamos and White Sands during the war. We know he held Q Security clearance, didn't care for Teller, thought Oppenheimer was a decent man, and was happy as hell to be back in the country where he grew up and out of New Jersey whenever he could. But he never told the stories I wish I had had been able to hear. We always seems to come up with the questions when it is too late.

    By the way, strong family resemblance there. Kjekk flicka! [?]

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  11. Now that's a ripping yarn, Doris! Even based on the little you know. (I'm not sure, but I think kjekk flicka is half Norwegian and half Swedish and translates to handsome girl.)

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  12. Norwegian underground ? Now, there's a story begging to be told. Or made up. I won't know the difference .... {Your dad is handsome and intriguing ~ I thinking perhaps Daniel Craig when the movie comes along.}

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  13. It's not fair, is it, that there's a pasty chap to his right, making Dad look like a superhero. I expect the boy was probably 16 or so; they all did what they could.

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  14. The kjekk flicka being you, of course. The phrase was devised with the help of T who speaks some sort of bastard Norswedanish, learned through travels. I am haunted still by the thirst for the stories now gone to the grave.

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  15. I have fun going through the two photo albums of his that I own, and trying to put some of the puzzle together. Apparently, after the war he went camping, or perhaps "camping," with a different girl every month. Always looks happy. He didn't get married until 30 or so, which was pretty old for the time. Then he came to the US, worked in Alaska, bought a motorcycle, moved to Washington, worked as a chauffeur while getting his master's in engineering. Sent for my mom, started a family. To the best of my knowledge (because one never really knows about these things), he was always faithful to my mother.

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  16. We knew an elderly Dutch couple who talked about their son being killed in the Underground. My mom suspected that the story might have been other than that, but that might just have been my mom.

    I like the little bell on your dad's bike.

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  17. The history in our own families . . . wonder if there's something -- a letter, a diary -- somewhere in a closet that could fill in the gaps.

    I remember the conversations after Christmas dinner or Thanksgiving dinner over coffee, dessert, cigarrettes. . . . not that much about the war, but as I sit here right now, I wish I had a smart phone to record them. The arrival at Birkenau in the spring of 45 especially.

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    1. Anyway, our history is pretty well recorded, what with blogs and such.

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    2. No question about that. Yet my uncle was observant and knew how to tell a story. The experiences of those with him are recorded. But I would like to have heard more of it from his perspective, as he would have described it.

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  18. Great photo! And it sparks imaginings of what he must have experienced in the N Underground.

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