Tuesday, March 18, 2014

What to do



when you live in a place that now goes from summer to summer,



skipping all those pesky seasons in between.



Get naked and irritated? Bash your brother? Clearly a classic option.



These days, we're dry. Parched, baked, scorched, dying for a drink.

And it's a weird thing, doing the Sophie's choice in the yard (this is not my yard). Because all my plants have a back story -- when I moved here the place was bare. So I've known my guys since they were in kindergarten. But I'm going to water some and let others die of thirst.

Is it the Bible or some hippy song that talks about water tasting like wine? Sounds biblical to me. Well, no matter. When you have no water, it's only wine that tastes like wine.

30 comments:

  1. But can we water the plants with wine? (Wine the plants?) Yes, some will have to go. Perhaps first the grass. I never much liked it anyway.

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  2. How about I give you some of the snow still piled up in our yard???

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  3. We lost a lot of plantings here in the our part of the world during the ice storms but I don't think even Southern Comfort would have helped them. I know choosing won't ease the pain but maybe a mojito for you out on the veranda...

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  4. What happens to a place like The Huntington, do they also have to choose?

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  5. The song that pops into my mind is Going Up The Country by Canned Heat.

    Well I'm going where the water tastes like wine
    We can jump in the water, stay drunk all the time

    I know exactly what you are saying about summer leading into summer. We are barely watering enough to keep our plants alive. We have a tiny little patch of grass and I think it knows that its days are numbered. I've always been frugal with water because it just seems to be a shame to waste it.

    Pretty soon the Gov. is going to re-institute the "if it's yellow, let it mellow, if it's brown, flush it down, policy.

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  6. Or perhaps an Imperial Tokaji?

    Yes, The Huntington does have to choose, to a degree.

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  7. Same here, Pat. I have two little patches of grass, and I'm not mowing them and that seems to help. But since this is March, I don't hold out much hope.

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  8. You want a taste of winter? I keep telling you to come here. It's not too late - bring Albert. *grin*

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  9. My plants are dying for a drink too, almost all the year.
    But the big problem on my garden is the hungry ants...
    Love these pictures! These garden looks a paradise!

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  10. I've given up on my yard - my new garden is outdoors, and it's so sad to see it parched, trees and shrubs dying, no wildflowers. We missed out on winter this year and we may not have spring. I live in hope of a miracle: Jesus turned water into wine. Perhaps he can turn wine into water.

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  11. Jut to be contrary I planted a lawn. 8 emerald greet flats of Saint Augustine. Landscaping for the Twyla Towers. And I lovingly keep it trim with scissors. It's my first lawn and a pleasure to walk barefoot on.

    My plan is not to let another plant die because of drought - or should I say prolonged drought. Of the four ornamental plumbs I planted since 1997, three have died; two last year. The last survivor now has a tree ring and will be watered regularly. Same treatment for the citrus. And if that doesn't work, I'm taking the Chieftess up on her offer.

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  12. The last time we dealt with drought we focused on keeping the trees alive.

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  13. I sure do wish we could even out the water needs across this fair land of ours. I, too, have snow I could ship your way if that would help. I know what it's like to lose plants, which can happen here if it gets too cold before there's snow-cover to protect the dormant plants, but I've never had to make the choice.

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  14. Chieftess: I'll split the cost of the truck to move snow from your yard and mine! Karin will enjoy it more than we do at this point.

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  15. My gardener was just here, and I asked him to take out a New Zealand Tea Tree because it's dead. He says it's not dead but on life support, and give it another couple of weeks. So I bet him a dollar and hope I lose.

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  16. I'm worried about the gardeners, too. Ours comes every two weeks to mow the "grass" and trim things. There won't be much for him to do.

    I saw a list of things to do in drought and it suggested watering the grass once a month, late night or early morning, for 30 minutes. We're trying that for now and it's working. You can wean it. I might starve it, though, for the sake of my trees.

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  17. Drought conditions are hard, especially later when the fires start. I wonder what would appease the rain gods/goddesses?

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  18. Ok fellow snowbirds...I think we've got the beginnings of a new business here!!!

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  19. About that Ti tree: Mine died last summer but I haven't taken it out yet. Because of its gnarly shape, it is now a yard sculpture, though I've whacked off a limb or two to decorate the rocky place that used to be the front lawn. You could also use it to hang limp broken dolls from in the Altadena Halloween tradition. If Albert wouldn't freak out.

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  20. It will be Easter in a month. Hang some colorful plastic eggs from your Tea Tree. That's a really popular yard decoration here.... although not in my yard.

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  21. Even though hanging dolls is delightfully horrifying, I think I'll pass. Terri, blue bottles on dead trees is pretty popular around here. Maybe the very first one I saw looked rather cleaver, there have been so many since I can't remember.

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  22. The colors are really popping more than usual in your photos--really nice. Are you doing something different?

    I sympathize with you and the drought problem. Even the short spells we have in the summer are hard. I'd choose a tree over a plant too, but I wouldn't be happy about it.

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  23. We are slowly switching out our lawns.

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  24. frolic in the autumn mist in a land called Honalee....I'd say you're there

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  25. Blogspot says you have a new post up, but Im not finding it.

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  26. Thank god you're not finding it. I hit publish rather than save. It's not ready.

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  27. Yes, it is Sophie's Choice. I hate this drought. But being reminded of Canned Heat's song Goin' Up the Country ("where the water tastes like wine") makes me glad I saw this post!

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  28. Goin' where the water tastes like wine----[Goin' where the climate suits my clothes--]. That venerable line has a long history. You'll find it as a verse in "I'm goin' down that road feelin' bad" [Lonesome Road Blues], going back to the 1920's and recorded by the likes of Woody Guthrie, Doc Watson, and the Grateful Dead, among others. A hard times song. Still resonates.

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  29. So hard to let plants go. Wonder how the native plants are doing along the Sam Merrill trail. Maybe yerba santa, bay laurel, Artemisia and manzanita are the ornamental plants of the here and now in Southern California.

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