Sunday, June 16, 2013

Dad, Footloose and Fancy Free in Alaska


Pre-responsibilities. I hope he didn't regret the trade-off too terribly, but I kinda think he did. We brought out the best in each other, adventure-wise; and the worst in each other, temper-wise. I remember my mom saying one day, wearily, "It's because you're too much alike."

My dad and I had our issues, but we also had certain pacts. Like when I took flying lessons, "Just don't tell your mother." And one time when Mercedes and I were ditching school to see the exhibit in Chicago, my dad drove us to the commuter train. He thought it more important that we catch the exhibit than spend a day in school.

We were late for the commuter and came to a stop light and Dad commanded, "Stay green."

And Mercedes said, "Wow, how did he do that -- it stayed green."

My dad could work magic.

29 comments:

  1. I had one of those, except mine rode a motorcycle and couldn't afford the boat.

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  2. yep, Dad's do have that certain magic.. and yes, we had our issues, rather he had issues... he just never realized u can't keep the old culture in the U.S.( even tho he was born and raised here...) I suppose u can keep the old ways but have to keep an open mind and let your kids jump from the nest and fly.

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  3. The interesting thing about parents is, they are so much else, other, less, or if you're lucky, more.

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  4. You are alike in your looks, as well.

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  5. Your Dad was a very handsome man. He reminds me of Paul Newman in this shot. He sounds like a cool guy.

    My Dad and I had our temper in common, too...yup, I think that's all. Oh, and a love of cheesy Western movies.

    Carolynn

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  6. Your Dad is very beautiful and I think you look like him.
    Love the picture!

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  7. He could have sold the hell out of some manly-man cologne.

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  8. A great tribute! The photo of him is captivating.

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  9. Maybe a healthy temper is part and parcel of an adventurous spirit . . .

    . . . which served him well in getting you out of day's drudgery in school for a more educational day in the city. Good for him.

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  10. Lovely piece. I inherited my sense of adventure and love of travel from my Dad. Unfortunately, he wasn't able to explore as he would have wanted. But he loved it that I was able to satisfy my wanderlust. We had great moments sharing pictures and stories.

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  11. I'm always glad to read that someone had a magical dad. It sounds like you hit the dad lottery.

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  12. Yup, a looker all right. I thought you look a lot like Mom, if I recall the image. That smile ... striking!

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  13. So often I just don't see what women are seeing in a movie hunk. With your dad, I get it.

    I like the exhibit episode; it says a lot. Have you ever tried to write up one of your fights? Too painful? What was he doing in Alaska?

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  14. I found it so interesting this year, the photos people chose on blogs or Facebook to honor their father. Some chose little boy photos, other a young dad, or a middle or old dad. I prefer to think of my father during his romantic period, before we came along.

    He was a trapper, or a trap watcher, in Alaska -- crabs and lobsters, I hope, but maybe something furry. They'd fly him and his buddies out on seaplanes to some outpost or another. They'd walk across rickety planks laid across the icy ocean. I have a couple of his sketches. It was seed money to bring my mom to the states. Then he got his master's degree at U of Washington in mechanical engineering, while working as a chauffeur for my Uncle Harold.

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  15. I imagine the Alaskan scenery was similar to Norwegian. Did he ever regret leaving Norway? I guess it was quite a poor country until North Sea gas was discovered.

    Oh look, the boat behind him has my name!

    On a miserable endnote, I always feel sad when Father's Day photos go up. My stepfather was bossy and often had a violent temper, and I didn't meet my real father until I was 21. Perhaps he could have been an occasional ally against my mother, but my stepsisters tell me he was authoritarian and hard on them. Perhaps that's how fathers in those days felt they had to be.

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  16. A great story, Karin, in every detail. As always.

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  17. First off, that is a great photo!
    It's nice that you and he found some common ground despite your dueling personalities. I have the same type of relationship with one of ours.

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  18. Bellis, as for immigrating to the US, I can't recall he ever uttered one word of regret. He liked wide open spaces; I think that's what brought him here. But you know what? I never thought to ask.

    Becky, I wonder.

    Hey Terry and Pat, as fathers, you might be surprised to learn how often your kids brag about you. Particularly Pat, a dueling personality.

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  19. Maybe people chose the photos they did because few exists. If you think about it, it was "dad" who was shooting the film. The invisible presence behind the lens

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  20. He reminds me of Paul Newman, too. And we can all do with a bit of magic.

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  21. Thanks for sharing him with us, especially those of us without such fond memories.

    My father wasn't a likeable guy and it took me many years to come to terms with that. I think, I hope, my son feels differently about me. I didn't want to make the same mistakes and, mostly, I haven't.

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  22. Wondeгful blog! I found it while bгowsing on Yаhoo News

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  23. Having issues is no problem. But having problems, now that's a big issue to deal with.
    As I look at your Dad's pic, I wunder who he or you have been told he resembles.

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  24. This is obscure, but the early photos of my dad look like Rutger Hauer in Soldier of Orange. To your comment, Cafe, I don't recall that anyone said he resembled anyone.

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