Sunday, April 28, 2013

Pasadena's Evanston Inn (and friends)



Morticia and Gomez weren't always in residence.



The Evanston Inn on Marengo Avenue was once a place where "Many well-to-do Midwesterners stayed in Pasadena in the 1880s and 1890s, once the transcontinental railroad made passage easy and inexpensive. The inn is located on Evanston Place, a name, like that of the inn, suggesting the city's Midwestern roots." [Pacific Coast Architectural Database]

And it doesn't take a whole lot of imagination to picture what's now:



as then:



I don't know what the future holds for the Evanston, but please, not another Pasadena gulag.



While doing some research, who should I virtually bump into but Pasadena Daily Photo.



Maybe she'll meet me on the porch



for some cookies and lemonade



and we'll talk about old times.

Maestro, please.

29 comments:

  1. That last shot - so evocative.

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  2. That's an old postcard, from the turn of the turn of the century.

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  3. When I saw the word Evanston, I immediately thought of the mid west..dang, gorgeous buildimg.. Cookies and lemonade? I was thinking margaritas on the rocks..and definitely Satie!

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  4. Beautiful, poignant post with a perfect musical ending.

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  5. Love the music! While you two are sipping lemonade on the porch I'll be waltzing in the parlour---

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  6. I would love to have some cookies and lemonade at the porch of that lovely house and with the bonus of the beautiful music "Je te veux!"
    Thanks!

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  7. I could turn that into a perfectly dandy house. It would be awful if it were bulldozed, as so many historic buildings are these days.

    And I'd go for the lemonade, maybe with strawberries.

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  8. Heritage Housing Partners was going to turn this into a lovely affordable housing project, but when the Gov. cut redevelopment monies, it all went to hell. Very sad.

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  9. bet this has something to do with your book

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  10. What a great old joint. And I like your hat, it's got personality.

    This reminds me of Diane Keaton singing "Seems like old times" in Annie Hall

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  11. I knew I shouldn't cop to that hat, but on the upside, my fingernails are really clean.

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  12. I think I'll have Lavender Lemonade and some kind of luscious butter cookies - and I'll watch the waltzing wearing my best batiste frock.

    It's a crime the way they changed the profile of that home, it was perfectly balanced to begin with.

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  13. What do you see, Paula. Because I was rather surprised that in 120 years, there was just -- what -- a stage-right cheek implant? But maybe I'm missing some other surgery. The porch, well, I think that's always the first to go. Had I been able to get to the back, I could have shown some cheap and serious work on the derriere.

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  14. Look at the second floor add-on right behind the palm tree. Neither were very thoughtful additions IMHO.

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  15. Good for you, Karin. When I photographed it, people were living there. Looks like they're not anymore. What happened? What Diana said, I guess.

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  16. What a perfect post. So sad to see it unloved now. Lovely music, too.

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  17. Don't know if Diana can shed light on what the future holds and who owns the property now.

    Paula, yes, that's what I saw. Weird.

    Adele, I love this piece because I didn't know Satie could do happy.

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  18. KB, I have Philippe Entremont's version of Je te veux and it's not peppy like this version but it builds to happy and remains there. More waltzy.

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  19. Wow! Love this place. It makes me a little sick and angry when treasures like this are bulldozed in the name of progress...

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  20. I like it, Paula. But a whole different feel.

    Fingers crossed, Pat. It's not over, she's still singing, sort of.

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  21. I knew a little about that old house, and you've added a little more to my limited knowledge.
    Was Evanston named for Evanston, ILL?

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  22. Wow. I didn't even know that was there. But then I've never stayed at the Pasadena Inn or eaten at Lanna Thai, either. But I have been to Snyder Diamond many times.

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  23. You have a way of blending happiness and sadness and beauty, just so. Satie . . . play that again, Maestro.

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  24. Good news, this building will be renovated and rehabilitated to it's former glory as part of a re-use proposal to turn it into 10 for-sale townhomes / flats. Plus a beautiful new back garden with some additional new condos surrounding it. Should be for sale in about 2-years.

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  25. Thanks! I would love a tour, pre- and post.

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  26. Ooh, me too, me too! I posted about the Evanston some time ago on Pasadena Daily Photo and I've always wondered what its fate would be.
    http://pasadenadailyphoto.blogspot.com/2011/08/victorian-pile.html

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  27. I saw a notice for public hearing on the corner of Marengo and Del Mar today. I see this beautiful building everyday when I come out of the underground garage across the street. I always wondered about its history and whether anyone will restore it. So I googled it and found your blog entry, along with its possible fate. Take a look at the proposed project.

    http://www.ci.pasadena.ca.us/Planning/evanstonscourt/

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