Thursday, December 15, 2011

What's This?





Hint -- over 120 years old, seen while on a second tour with Manny Rodriguez of Lincoln Heights. Thank you again, Manny. Father Tom was a highlight, as were the best short ribs EVAH cooked in red sauce with cactus slices at El Huarachito on Broadway.


41 comments:

Pasadena Adjacent said...

I'm going to guess an organ with eastern european ancestry but what church I can't tell you. I only enter them when having to attend funerals. Those pipes are lovely

-K- said...

Karin, please don't post references to short ribs in red sauce so close to dinnertime.

It's just not right.

altadenahiker said...

I'm sure you're right about the ancestry. Trust me not to think to ask.

So 1886 -- that would have been about 15 years from the time the transcontinental railroad made its way to California and effectively joined the rest of the nation.

altadenahiker said...

Oh, K -- I'm not kidding. These were the best ribs I've ever had.

Petrea Burchard said...

Bummed to have missed it. That is a gorgeous organ. How's Manny?

Brenda Vaccarro said...

are you and Manny dating?

Mister Earl said...

The thing I liked best about that church is that it was instrumental in the 60s with Cesar Chavez organizing there and many of the 60s Chicano protests movements starting there. They started in this Episcopal Church because the Catholic Church was not willing to host such events.

Mister Earl said...

"For over one-hundred-twenty years The Church of the Epiphany has been an important part of the Lincoln Heights section of Los Angeles. Our Church began as a small rural church designed by Ernest Coxhead in 1883. The building was expanded in 1913, with a new main church by Arthur Benton, with the main “Epiphany” window designed by Tiffany, and the other stained glass by artisans based in Los Angeles. Our pipe organ is by Henry Pilcher. But, most importantly, is Epiphany’s role in the struggle for Latino rights during the 1960's and 1970's. Under the leadership of Fathers John Luce and Roger Wood, our church served as the home of La Raza, the Chicano newspaper; the Chicano Moratorium was planned there and the Brown Berets met there to plan political action. We sponsored events which celebrated Mexican and Indigenous culture. Today, we continue this tradition of service to the neighborhood. In 2005 Epiphany was designated a historical landmark by the City of Los Angeles."

Susan Campisi said...

Beautiful organ, interesting history.

altadenahiker said...

Petrea, quite well.

No Brenda, that's why I went to church.

Earl, the window is by Tiffany? The one on the north side? I think I've got a picture...

Shell Sherree said...

I'd comment but I have to pull my salmon from the oven, sure in the knowledge it will taste nothing like those short ribs.

Kalei's Best Friend said...

BEAUTIFUL photos of the organ 'pipes'.. almost a fish eye effect..

bandit said...

Damn, girl, how'd you capture that light? Delicious - I'm beginning to drool.

Pierre said...

When I was a kid, my friends and I would go to Oaks Amusement Park for an afternoon of roller skating. Suspended from the ceiling 20 feet above center rink was a box car sized Wurlitzer pipe organ/orchestra that would fill the room with music while we skated. I've never taken pipe organ music seriously because of that. Bethoven's fugue in E minor makes me want to skate.

Check out the Oaks organ here:
http://www.pstos.org/instruments/or/portland/oakspark.htm

altadenahiker said...

Oh, that's funny Pierre. (Here's the corrected link:
http://www.pstos.org/instruments/or/portland/oakspark.htm)

Yeah, for me the organ is more of a feast for the eyes than the ears. But what do I know -- I like bagpipes.

Shell, I don't think salmon was on the menu. In fact, I didn't recognize a lot of things that were on the menu -- it wasn't a typical combination plate kind of a place.

K & B, I wish I had made an adjustment to the ISO. Keep forgetting that.

Brenda's Arizona said...

Organ pipes!
I really liked the post you removed. Touching... truthful.

Latino Heritage said...

At really first glance, pre-second cup of coffee, I thought they were books caught at some delightfully off kilter angle. The brilliance of the color makes me want to run my finger on the gold. By the way, I love bagpipes, too.

Latino Heritage said...

At really first glance, pre-second cup of coffee, I thought they were books caught at some delightfully off kilter angle. The brilliance of the color makes me want to run my finger on the gold. By the way, I love bagpipes, too.

Marjie said...

What a pretty pipe organ! manny's a great find for you!

Carolynn said...

Beautiful old pipe organ! I can smell the musty scent that is particular to churches, too.

Anonymous said...

I guessed a library at first. I guessed wrong.

Ms M said...

Beautiful organ pipes! And fascinating history from Mr. Earl. Sounds like a wonderful tour with Manny

Mister Earl said...

I now recall what father Tom said about why the Catholic Church was not hospitable to the protest movements of the 60s. "They thought they were communists. And probably some of them were."

Bellis said...

Wish I hadn't peeled off from Manny's tour before you got to the church, which looks mighty interesting. And who doesn't love organ music, if it's Toccata and Fugue or the music from Babe (Saint Saens)? Can't wait to go back to the restaurant - I didn't feel hungry the rest of the day after that excellent lunch. Lincoln Heights is full of interesting places, if you have a good guide like Manny.

Katie said...

Wow what a gorgeous set of pipes. And the church as Tiffany windows too? Sounds like a must-see spot, especially if the tour includes ribs.

sonia a. mascaro said...

Beautiful organ, Karin! The luminosity of these photos are fantastic.
Love organ music.

Mister Earl said...

Henry Pilcher's Sons Organ Company. "Henry Pilcher, Sr. was born in Canterbury, England and apprenticed as an organ builder in London. In 1832 he arrived in New York and established his business in Newark, New Jersey. His sons, Henry Pilcher, Jr. and William Pilcher II opened an organ building shop in St. Louis, Missouri in 1852. During the Civil War era, the firm relocated to Chicago, Illinois. This factory survived the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 and, in 1874, the Pilcher firm once again moved and opened their business in Louisville, Kentucky. The firm built over 1,800 organs for churches, concert halls, and universities across the country. In 1944 the factory closed and the assets were sold to the M. P. Möller Organ Company of Hagerstown, Maryland."

Kaori said...

The photos are gorgeous. Again, I recognized them from my past relationship with pipe organs...seeing them through your photos is much much better than having to play them :)

Paula said...

This is the second time in just a few days that I've seen an Episcopal church referenced as a mission parish/church. I think it means that in the beginning they have a building but not a regular priest or visa versa. When the two finally come together then they vote and can become a self-governing parish.

I would love to hear that organ, I'm sure it's amazing.

Paula said...

Earl, regarding the Catholic Church not helping, it's basically a benevolent dictatorship, the bishop assigns the priests and the parish deals with it. In the American Episcopal church we have a governing body in each church called the Vestry who hires their own priest and decides what kind of ministries they want for their parish. We like our independence.

altadenahiker said...

Wish I'd been able to get a good picture of the vaulted ceilings -- all wood and beams, beautiful.

Earl -- fascinating stuff. This church would make a great article, wouldn't it? Given that the church is not located in a wealthy area, fund raising is a special challenge. Father Tom said the organ alone required $80K in restoration, which, relative to organs such as these, is not a large amount. Just hard for him to raise.

Paula, didn't know that!

Paula said...

I know I'm being nerdy but what they did was commit to the kind of ministry that few congregations are willing or able to do. They deserve lots of support and I'll be happy to contribute something to it. Do you know where I can send it?

Paula said...

Here's what they auctioned off in November:

http://epiphanyconservation.org/gallery.html

Mister Earl said...

Even more history and other stuff on this website Paula found:

http://epiphanyconservation.org

Paula: Is All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena a similar ministry? I know they are very political and involved in social action.

Latino Heritage said...

Re: Catholic church and helping out...like most other churches it varied. There were those congregations and priests that were very much a part of what became the Liberation Theology movement. During the 60s many of the larger congregations who were more removed from communities like East L.A. or South Central were not interested in helping. Some may not have understood the gravity of the situation and others may have chosen to not participate.
Having been a congregant of both an Episcopal and a Roman Catholic church, I would say that there were challenges in either system. Sometimes vestries can be very focused on parish politics. Folks is folks - good and bad things happen because of the dynamics involved.

Paula said...

Latino Heritage, exactly, it depends from church to church and priest to priest. What I was trying to say is that if a Catholic church didn't become involved it might not be for lack of interest. My church, unlike me, is very conservative but we still care for each other no matter what and that is something very, very special.

Paula said...

Sorry Earl, I nearly forgot. I looked it up on Wikipedia and the have a history of inclusion that is really interesting and that might answer your question:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Saints_Episcopal_Church_%28Pasadena,_California%29

CafePasadena said...

I guess is this is an old church with beautiful bound volumes of religious books.

If by chance I'm incorrect, then lettuce try cookbooks or winebooks.

altadenahiker said...

Sometime soon (I hope), I'm going to be lucky enough to tour East LA with Latino Heritage.

PJ, I'm going to send a small donation to this church, too. Though I'm not religious, I like the legacy, Father Tom, and am all for preserving this piece of history.

bandit said...

Another vote for bagpipes. I love a dissonant note - segue to Liberation Theology, maybe? Someone tell us more, please.

bandit said...

Thanks for the personal note of explanation, Paula. How very inspiring a movement.