Wednesday, December 7, 2011

It Takes a Village


We can either approach a natural-born emergency as individuals or as a community.

There’s something redundant, inherently inefficient, when we all plan to meet a disaster wielding the same tools.

Some of us should be charged with stockpiling batteries, lanterns, generator, a pantry full of canned goods, water, and closets filled with extra blankies.

Then some of us should have a car full of gas, a case of wine in the trunk, and a list of addresses where we can find the aforementioned stockpile.

This can only work with true foresight, effort, and sensitivity. Remember: Not everyone likes Chardonnay.

37 comments:

  1. so important to keep wine at the ready.
    once i went on "vacation" in a dry county.

    you don't appreciate normal civilisation until you spend a night in a dry county.

    xxa

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  2. In the Northridge earthquake, my neighborhood came together... On our block (in Santa Clarita) we had an electrician, fireman, plumbing contractor (my hubby)... another w/a backup generator who also had an extra fridge... he was so kind as to let neighbors bring their perishables... We came together like u wouldn't believe... Each showed their craft in what they do daily. I so agree w/you on this ..

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  3. sidebar: the neighbors even watched other neighbors' kids as well... one big co-op on our cul-de-sac.

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  4. Haha, you guys were too quick on the draw. Now it's ready. (Amy, so true. And Kalei, I want to live on your block.)

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  5. Excellent point! And please do make sure you have Chenin Blanc or Pinot Grigio on hand if I'm caught in a storm in 'dena country.

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  6. Whatever Chardonnay is left over, ship my way please. I'm not picky because I live in a "dry county" like Amy visited. She's right. It's downright uncivilized.

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  7. Wine? fluck wine. I want to know who has the good drugs and who keeps the hard liquor. Your way to civilized in the denas

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  8. We'll stockpile the Jameson's and a bit of wine...perhaps that's enticement for a northerly excursion???

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  9. What kinds of wine and booze was SCE giving out at their help centers?

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  10. Very thoughtful post. (And true, not everyone likes Chardonnay. Some folks might need a stiffer drink under these circumstances :-))

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  11. Shhhh. If things get really dicey, I keep a bottle of real Norwegian aquavit for my closest friends.

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  12. Linie akvavit, for those who know the real thing.

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  13. Please let me be in charge of the Manhattans. Wait, wait--I dint know bout the acquavit

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  14. Btw: The original name is Linjeakevitt and has been sailing back and forth to Australia before shipped to US.

    It tastes good to the Christmas Eve dinner (Ribbe og surkål).

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  15. Bonjour! Thank you for stopping by my blog today and leaving a comment. I see that you are already thinking about cocktail parties in spite of this week's "natural disaster." I am with you on always having wine at hand (well, and other supplies too, but they are kind of boring.) We get these "natural disasters" here too, in the Pacific Northwest. My parents' last two trips to Seattle's suburbia (where I live): First we lose power and heat for 4 days - in December - The following year, we get snowed in for 4 days. They live in Paris. France and have not been back yet ;-) -- Hope things get back on track for you quickly. Veronique (French Girl in Seattle)

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  16. I know which team I'll be playing on.

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  17. I'll drink the Chard, if need be in the winter, but for summer outages, I'd prefer a Pinot Grigio or even Sauv Blanc. Of course, winter outages could manage a deep Merlot or a Viognier.

    But Jameson or Glenlivet would be a nice choice for something harder.

    Aquavit...the potato variety would fit in nicely too. Don't think I've tasted it---anything like Slivovitz?

    Oh and next time, call me. I have a stockpile of batteries, lanterns and other supplies AND the Glenlivet. Yes, I was a Girl Scout for years. You can thank me later. ;-)

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  18. When it snows here, the city of B'ham SHUTS DOWN. Too many hills and nobody even knows what tire chains are. Most folks head to the Piggly Wiggly and hoard milk and bread. Moi....I head to the liquor store and hoard bourbon. It all works out.

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  19. I'm trying to get my dudes to install generators. 3 generators. They're balking. So I keep bottled water and lots of food and candles.

    And we have to worry about freezing here, which is not a problem you face! Trust me. Frozen pipes are less than no fun.

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  20. Prior to last year's storm of the century, I hit it up to all the stores to stock the larder, preparing to do nothing for the entire weekend. All went well 'til I got to the discount liquour store - they had policemen directing traffic in the parking areas. Prioritization . . .

    http://haikubanditsociety.blogspot.com/2010/12/blog-post_2307.html

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  21. That was one of the more interesting things I've read today.

    Diversification is key. Having limes on hand in case someone remembers the tequila might be important as well.

    Pearl

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  22. So far we've got 24 people driving around in cars full of cocktails with no place to go. We need a destination -- a warm, well lighted house, full of blankets, food, and batteries. This may be harder than I thought.

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  23. 24 people clear on priorities--

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  24. Personally, I would like to lay claim to the job of panicking. I will do a bang up job!

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  25. Very thoughtful words, KB. I know who I'm gonna call in a natural born killer emergency. However, can I trust you with stockpiling some macarons for me?

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  26. Since I live in a neighborhood of churches and theological institutes, I doubt that my neighbors will be as well-stocked with necessities (especially liquor) as will be necessary after the big one on the Hayward Fault (which is a block away), so I better get my own earthquake kit together. If I get a big box of chocolate energy bars, hit the liquor store, then scout the neighborhood for lime trees I should be able to survive on my own for a while. Or else I'll drive South as it sounds like most of you are well-stocked with the good stuff!

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  27. Anyone with a car full of cocktails is welcome to come right on over to Chez Tommy. Julio the electrician is coming over in the morning, and I'm going to ask him about a generator. I'll stock up on batteries and blankets. The 4 furry inhabitants will provide added warmth to willing laps.

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  28. Well...with all those supplies Hiker, you're all welcome to come on up here and set up camp!!! With all those bodies and booze up here, we ought to stay plenty warm!!!

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  29. As Mary Chapin Carpenter wrote of Louisiana, "Hurricane parties every time it blows!"

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  30. This is quite a menu: A couple of cookies, a pack of energy bars, limes, and enough liquor to stock BevMo.

    Who's the designated driver?

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  31. I will NOT drink your lousy stinking chardonnay under any circumstance.

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  32. you'd be welcome up here, but it's quite a drive---might take more than 2 carloads of liquor to get up here...and then you'd run me out of Glenlivet AND batteries! Wait, that sounds wrong. Anyway, hit up Chieftess---am sure the Chief has access to supplies or generator or, you know, warm stuff.

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  33. you'd be welcome up here, but it's quite a drive---might take more than 2 carloads of liquor to get up here...and then you'd run me out of Glenlivet AND batteries! Wait, that sounds wrong. Anyway, hit up Chieftess---am sure the Chief has access to supplies or generator or, you know, warm stuff.

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  34. My emergency plan has always been to live close enough so I can walk (within a day) to my parents . . . they have the generator, pantry, blankets, etc. I can carry some wine as a peace offering.

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