Friday, September 23, 2011

On the list of overused and irritating words of 2011



“Actually” made the cut.

This actually made me wince.

Because I use “actually” all the time, actually. Actually, I drop “actually” as a punctuation mark. It’s the equivalent of an em dash -- oh yes, I'm about to say something witty.

No, I don't mean now. I mean when I say "actually."

Actually, “actually” is a wink, with my left eye, the cute one -- the one that can also raise an eyebrow, after years of practice.

For god sakes, if they’re going to bully any word, how about “hopefully,” as in “hopefully we will …” How about the “and” in between century dates, as in 2 thousand “and” 11. Because both of those are equally, actually wrong. Whereas “actually” has party manners -- never grammatically wrong, just waving its fan, biding its time. Ready to say in one word what usually takes two or four times as many. “In reality”, or “The way I see it,” or “From my point of view."

Strip “actually” from my arsenal, and there will be unpleasant consequences. For real. When all is said and done. At the end of the day. I kid you not.

Oh yes, the photo. It has nothing to do with any of this. I just liked it. No shit.

48 comments:

  1. I fretted momentarily, until I realised you actually endorse the use of actually, upon which my gaze does fondly rest. Boo to hopefully. I will strike it from my arsenal and celebrate my new-found air of decisiveness.

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  2. Actually, I'm a big fan of Actually, myself. Because I like to be precise. You know. I suppose, I'm actually quite particular about that. Love this. You do have a way with a word.

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  3. Actually is as important as having a hankie at the ready and never should have been included in some horrid little list.

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  4. I know about the grammatical problem of using hopefully incorrectly but truthfully it's been a problem since long before than two thousand and eleven, it's actually been a pain in the backside 365/24/7 for donkey's ages. If I recall correctly.

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  5. Actually has a hankie and, more importantly, knows how to use it.

    GG

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  6. shop talk

    few, glad I passed mustard on my latest bity opus

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  7. You do make me laugh, and yes, cringe too, because ACTUALLY, I happen to rely rather heavily on the usage of this delightfully succinct word (grin)!

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  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. I guess this means we're all friends of actually, or actually friends.

    PA, whenever I ask for mustard, you never fail to pass it.

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  10. In the Pearls Before Swine comic strip, Rat periodically bashes someone who overuses LOL. As for me, I'm really irked by idiots who say "I could care less!" when they mean exactly the opposite. When I get the chance, I tell them to endeavour to care less, perhaps not at all, or learn to use words properly. I'm not that popular

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  11. Actually is a warning that you probably won't like what I'm about to say, because you've been misled or have an expectation that's about to be dashed...

    You've been looking over that menu for ten minutes, but...
    "Actually, we're out of chicken salad."

    "Actually, that bathroom is out of order."

    "Actually, that's not Sinatra."

    It really is a hankie, isn't it?

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  12. Actually, the good news is, I don't like chicken, and I don't have to go. But I do need a hankie, because I have to blow my nose, though I suppose you could care less.

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  13. And you would always know Sinatra.

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  14. Actually, I like a comment I got from a friend who asked when "no problem" replaced "you're welcome." Examples would be when served in a restaurant and you say "thank you" to the waiter and he replies "no problem." Well, I'm glad I didn't inconvenience him by choosing the restaurant where he works and pay for a meal with a tip that goes into his pocket. I never thought about it until it was mentioned to me and now I cringe anytime someone uses that term instead of "you're welcome."

    That's the actual truth.

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  15. So DB, he next time a waiter says, "No problem," you reply, "Actually, there is a problem."

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  16. I have to read and run - is "though" a word, or a contraction? I sctually do say it it all the time.
    Aw shit. My wv is "hyper.

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  17. Actually, I agree with you, entirely.

    "Hopefully" doesn't grate on me to the extent that misplaced apostrophes do, but still.

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  18. Sorry for the typos. I just posted an ellipsis at Melissa Allen's blog . . .

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  19. Lots of statues today. Lots of art.

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  20. PA, are you getting/have a hammie? I have a serious weakness for them.

    AH, "no worries" tops my list. Actually, I'm kinda worried about its continued use.

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  21. Bandit, "though" is allowed. "That said," isn't.

    And I fear DB has a bit of a problem with me. Paula, didn't everyone pick up "no worries" from the shrimp on the barbie guy?

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  22. I was able to use the hankie today on Facebook, "Actually, Onesuite, your email was misleading. For the back-to-school 15% off it clearly states that the expiration is September 15, but for the 10% off for a Facebook Like, the email shows no expiration."

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  23. I'm soooo guilty, actually.

    Actually, "Soooo" should be on the list, too.

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  24. Shit, Karin. I thought shit ...

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  25. Actually, there are other possibilities: categorically, come hell or high water, conclusively, decidedly, decisively, definitely, doubtless, easily, exactly, for sure, no ifs ands or buts, no strings attached, on the button, on the money, on the nose, positively, precisely, really, right on, straight out, sure as can be, sure as hell, sure enough, sure thing, surely, the very thing, truly, unambiguously, unconditionally, unquestionably.

    So to rephrase my intro sentence -
    "Come hell or high water, there are other possibilities."

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  26. A friend who works in a retail chain store told me they are taught to say, "No problem." It's thought to be more modern. Jeeze.

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  27. But it is a problem, Mr. Earl. I used to be annoyed when a server would deliver the meal and say, "enjoy!" in a cheerful voice. How about, "I hope you enjoy" instead of giving me an order to do so. But, "enjoy" has been replaced by "no problem" as my pet peeve. It also bugs me when my son and others of his generation order food by saying, "Can I have a cheese burger?" It ought to be "I'd like a cheeseburger." I'm waiting for a smart-ass server to respond, "yes, would you like one?" or just respond with "yes" but nod get one since he didn't ask for one. I guess we're showing our age, Mr. Earl.

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  28. Oh, no worries, DB and Earl.

    Honestly, if you dot all the I's and cross all the T's, see it my way, or think what you like, when you separate the wheat from the chaff, take the long view, try as you might, take a deep breath, kiss my ass, the long and the short of it is ... I'm hyperventilating... Pierre may be walking away with the prize.

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  29. But what's your "bottom line," KB?

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  30. Smart money says, you just made my head explode.

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  31. "I'm waiting for a smart-ass server to respond, "yes, would you like one?" or just respond with "yes" but not get one since he didn't ask for one."

    In Israel, smart-ass replies are common. If you're in a group of people and you're not hungry and say, "I'll have nothing," you're likely to get, "Would you like that on a plate or in a pita?"

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  32. My pet peeve is people saying "I need" instead of "I would like to." It's an order, as in "I need to see your ID, ma'am." And ma'am gets me riled up even more. Don't ma'am me!

    Oh, actually, there is one exception. We loyal Briish subjects have to address QEII as "marm" if she ever comes to tea. And yes, I HAVE dreamt that the Queen came to my house for tea. It was a nightmare, as I hadn't cleaned the house or bought a new toilet seat for her.

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  33. You have to buy a new toilet seat if the Queen visits?!

    Regarding all these overused and irritating words, I am guilty as charged, except for the use of "and" in between century dates. That really should be a crime.

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  34. Karin: Your photo seems to go from black and white to color. Is that just how it came out, or did you create that look? Either way, very nice.

    WV: submed. "Actually, I'm a lot calmer when I take both my meds and my submeds."

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  35. I'm actually speechless I'm laughing so hard!!!

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  36. Geez, KB, like, you make that sound so poetic.

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  37. Speaking of words I hate, let me add "Altadena is nestled in the foothills." If I hear this nestled in the foothills business one more time, I'll throw up. Actually.

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  38. perfect.

    And ditto for nestling. Want another? Newscast (at least once a week, if not twice) 'An east coast town is reeling tonight....'

    Reeling...like the entire town tilted sideways and everyone rolled off the sidewalk. Reminds me of pinball machines.

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  39. Actually I like this post. And hopefully we will see lots more photos like this one.
    No shit. For real.

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  40. Deborah --- "the southland"

    What is that?

    I was watching the news in another city, state and they said "in the southland" too. No one ever says "in the northland" or "Today, in the northeastland..."

    """""

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  41. Oh-oh. Raising my hand and waving it wildly. One more I hate:

    There's a local radio newscaster who says, "In our valley areas." As in, "It will be 90 degrees in our valley areas." Ok, I get valley, as in San Gabriel Valley, but what the heck is a valley area?

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  42. Right! Is it too exhausting to actually name the place by it's real and authentic (actual) name? GAWD!

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  43. Maybe newsies wanna be generic for their reels (reeling).


    Dumbbunnies

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  44. Actually, the word actually is to adults as like is to teenagers. Like in your post you actually typed the word actually like a million times.

    Actually, I do not use the word like, like I am no longer a teenager...far from that dreadful time. Actually, it was nearly 30 years ago.

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  45. So. I say so too much. I'm not standing up for it. I've got no actually to stand on.

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