Saturday, September 25, 2010

Lincoln Heights Library, continued





I'm impressed by the curve of the walls, the quirky stacks, the natural light. Far more impressive is to find a library filled with parents and children. Not only that, it's parents and kids who aren't jockying for a place at the computer (uh, that would be Altadena Library).

Here, they sit at tables and read books. How novel.



I like this neighborhood better and better.

25 comments:

  1. Very nice and simple. My hometown is on their third main library since I was a kid. The newest one seems much too complicated.

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  2. What a find! Never been. The curved walls are lovely and your are right about the natural light.
    The smaller libraries seem to be the best for parents and kids to read.

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  3. The light is beautiful! I like the idea of books taking priority over computers in a library. Call me old-fashioned.

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  4. I agree; lovely light. What a fine place.

    wv: capbr

    And the capbr is that old house, with its many chimneys.

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  5. No wood paneling, but a bright, pleasant place to share a book with Mom or Dad. Bravo to the parents of Lincoln Heights!

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  6. A little blurb from Wiki:

    Lincoln Heights is considered to be the oldest neighborhood in Los Angeles, dating to the 1830s. Perched on bluffs above the Los Angeles River, it was originally home to some of the city's wealthiest residents, who built a large number of Victorian mansions in the district (many of which have been preserved under the city's historic preservation program). North Broadway became a busy commercial strip, which it remains today. By the turn of the 20th century, however, the rapid industrial development along the riverbanks made it less appealing for wealthy Angelenos, who moved on first to the Arroyo Seco area and Hollywood, then (from the 1920s onward) to rapidly developing Mid-Wilshire. As wealthy residents departed, Lincoln Heights became home to a large Italian American population, as well as an increasingly large Mexican American population. It and its cross-river neighbor "Little Italy" (what is now Chinatown) formed the heart of southern California's Italian-American community. One of the major landmarks from this period, the San Antonio Winery, continues to operate today, albeit with non-local grapes.

    Beginning just after World War II, Italians and some Mexicans began migrating out of Lincoln Heights and into working-class and middle-class suburbs in the San Gabriel Valley, including Alhambra, San Gabriel, Rosemead, Montebello, and Temple City. This process accelerated during the 1950s with the construction of the Golden State Freeway, which split the district right down the middle and devastated the neighborhoods through which it passed. Ever since, Lincoln Heights has been a poor-to-working class Chicano and Latin American immigrant barrio. Many Chinese immigrants, mainly from Southeast China and Vietnam, and their US-born children also reside in Lincoln Heights, due to its proximity to Chinatown.

    WV: hykersau

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  8. Whether in cities or small towns, I always wonder why people felt an urge to leave nice, big houses and porches like the one in your photo, especially if they're not moving to larger plots, just newer houses that are featureless by comparison.

    Earl's Wiki piece gives at least some explanation--who wants to live next to industry? But is it always that obvious or that simple?

    I like the exterior of that library as much as the interior.

    Nice post.

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  9. This morning there's a photo piece at SFgate.com on Jerry Garcia's house that's being offered for 4 million. It is a new stucco house built in 1989. It's big and has all the modern features, but it makes me know why I love old houses so much. The Garcia house for me has no charm or interest.

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?f=/c/a/2010/09/26/REB01FIHVP.DTL&o=0

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  10. I love the photos of the inside, Karin. I wanted this so be perfect, and it nearly is!

    I found (online) the program from the re-dedication (reopening?). It was an interesting find - in english, spanish and chinese. What lovely flavors!

    What is next on your list of discoveries, Altadena Columbus?

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  11. It's a find. Makes me want to wander.

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  12. I'm at work now, but when I leave I hope to explore a street I found in Lincoln Heights called Eastlake. If the heat doesn't kill me.

    Both Hispanic and Asian influences on and ownership of this neighborhood are immediately apparent. I don't see the Italians yet.

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  13. My great grandmother lived in a neighborhood in L.A. I remember once visiting her when I was a child. I have one uncle still living that may know where she lived. I love the history of old towns and neighborhoods.

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  15. Ja Earl, I've been doing some research too. Had no idea this is the oldest LA neighborhood. So I'm trying to do the great-grandmother math to figure out whether Christine's relative was a likely resident.

    Banjo, I don't think it is that simple. And there's some action going on in them thar hills, good and bad. Will be sharing later today.

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  16. I was just thinking of you and of this post, PA. I was thinking, the people who live there have always known about it so to them it's not a find. And I bet PA's already been all over it.

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  17. That's a beautiful library, inside and out. Libraries have to be one of my favorite places on earth. You'll know how much I love books when you see my whining - I mean, post - today.

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  18. The light is really wonderful. I'm another one who loves libraries.

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  19. When I first came to LA in 1981, there was an Italian Deli in Chinatown called Dario's. We'd go there often for sandwiches. Also, there was Little Joe's restaurant in Chinatown. Those were the last vestiges of the Italian neighborhood that was once there. They are long since gone, although the Little Joe's property still stands vacant. San Antonio winery, on the Lincoln Heights side of the river, is of course still going.

    Meanwhile, as the 80s progressed, many of the best Chinese restaurants in Chinatown left for Monterey Park and were replaced by Vietnamese restaurants.

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  20. Thanks for stopping by in the neighborhood! Next time I suggest you pick up a sandwich at Lanza Bros to enjoy at the park.

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  21. I read the Eastlake post before this one. You're on a roll. I like it. There's so much of L.A. that I never explore. Lincoln Heights is a pocket I barely knew existed other than by name. Thanks for the tour.

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  22. Beautiful library!!!

    My step daughter's boyfriend was telling me about when they were first moving into our house in Glendale this summer...my cousin and his wife were staying there to watch our animals and visit with their daughter who lives in Studio City, Tim had changed the Direct TV to HD for when they were going to move in and our tv's no longer worked. As I had told him I wanted them to have tv, he was concerned and spoke to them about it. They told him not to worry, they'd sit on the porch and read...and what do you know...they did!!! They read for hours!!! He was astounded!!! I told him that was something people in our generation do...we read!!!

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  23. I love when "my" Lincoln Heights is discovered and enjoyed by others. I've lived in this neighborhood for 40 years and have no plans on leaving. Being the oldest suburb in Los Angeles, LIncoln Heights has a golden history and vibrant present. I enjoy showing off my community, so if you're interested in touring our streets email me at mannyzr@yahoo.com. Check out lincolnheightsla.com for history lesson.

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