Sunday, September 26, 2010

Lincoln Heights, Eastlake Avenue








Eastlake isn't east of a lake -- Eastlake was a who not a where. You probably knew that, but I didn't. Nor did the 80-year old resident I talked to. "There's never been a lake here as long as I can remember," she told me.

Eastlake authored in a Victorian style of architecture, bits and pieces of which still exist on the avenue, an old avenue in the oldest neighborhood in Los Angeles. I'm sure the prime examples of Eastlake Victorian were at the top of the hill; you won't find them now.

You won't find the horses, either. But if you look really hard, you will find what's left of the old corrals.

(Thanks to lincolnheightsla.com for the old horse photo.)

26 comments:

Mister Earl said...

Nice!

Petrea said...

Today? Man, it was hot. You are hooked.

Susan Campisi said...

Great photos! I didn't know any of those tidbits of L.A. history. Good stuff.

altadenahiker said...

I admit, it was too hot to take the miles and miles to stairways up through the hills. But it's a thrill to find the original heart of LA.

Shell Sherree said...

I enjoyed the tour and the history, KB. There's a suburb here called Westlake ~ named after a man-made lake. Seems rather too predictable now.

Jean Spitzer said...

I love the history, which I didn't know, and the photos.

The remnant of corral reminds me of Old Town Pasadena, where you can still see stables.

Christine said...

Those homes are beautiful. Wouldn't it be fun to go through one of them.

BaysideLife said...

Thank goodness these homes are still in the landscape, lending a sense of place to this neighborhood. They are little tickles to our curiousity, motivating us to look into their stories. I've really enjoyed the tour and history.

Anonymous said...

Hey, if you look behind the horses you can see a cowboy riding at the base of the hill.

Pasadena Adjacent said...

Did you pick up some gazpacho while you were there?

Petrea said...

You probably all know about the Big Orange Landmarks blog. A treasure trove I've only recently found. I've started reading from the beginning. Some of Lincoln heights must be in this section.

altadenahiker said...

Thanks P, no didn't know about the site. In addition to the one I mentioned on the last page, http://www.chanfles.com/things.htm
also gives a tour of his Lincoln Heights. He also mentioned that LH was built pre-motorized transportation, so much of it was designed for pedestrians.

PA, I'm dying to know the street.

Marjie said...

You know I love the old houses.

I know someone who lives in Denver, raised on the East coast, whose mother in law was stunned when she moved into a 20 year old house. The woman's words were, "Why do you want to live in a used house?"

Names of places amaze me, too. It's always fun to learn why a place is called what it is.

Brenda's Arizona said...

Oooh, sweet houses.
Where does the gazpacho fit in (that PA mentioned)?

Mister Earl said...

Took a detour home today. From North Mission turned onto Broadway and headed west. Drove up Workman and saw the library. It's interesting how Lincoln Heights becomes Montecito Heights (some nice Victorians there I think) becomes Highland Park, then across to Arroyo to South Pasadena. Thanks for the inspiration KB.

WV: bywor. By wor bonds!

Anonymous said...

Lake or no lake, that's quite a view.

JJ

pasadenapio said...

The house in that top photo needs some TLC STAT!

If those walls could talk...

Miss Janey said...

Miss J loves LA neighborhood history. Thanks for sharing.

altadenahiker said...

PIO, there seems to be a love affair with chain link around this area. Pity.

Marjie, my mother was that way. She didn't want to live in a house anyone had lived in before. Of course I felt and feel the opposite.

I know Brenda, that sounds darn tasty right about now.

You're welcome, Miss J and Mr E. Someday I'll make it to some of those stairways if you don't beat me to it.

Jean, I'm curious to know when the last LH stable closed. Judging from the bits of fencing, I'd say when the Talkies came in.

Birdman said...

VERY neat buildings.

BANJO52 said...

Again, I wonder why "we" wanted to leave such buildings. Maybe your mother's feelings, like mine, were widely shared, but I still wonder why.

Petrea said...

It may be generational, Banjo. In the 50's, for example, everything was new, jet-age, modern. People wanted to live that, forget the war years, be prosperous. The "old" seemed dumpy to them. Much of the preservation my (our?) generation embraces seems to me a reaction to that.

Pat Tillett said...

first off, great photos!
second off, why would they call a place a lake, when there is no lake?

crazy californians...

TheChieftess said...

Love, love, love these old houses!!! And the history, and the horses, and...

And thank you Petrea for linking the Big Orange Landmarks blog! I just recently drove through Elysian park and saw the gate to the Monticello de Leo Politi Park and thought that was one place I'd like to visit...

my grandmother was a librarian for 52 years in the LA County system and gave me many of Leo Politi's books, some signed...my most treasured remembrances of my youth...

BANJO52 said...

Petrea, that sounds logical--well, logical explanation of an illogical frame of mind. I'd understand it more if the lots were significantly bigger. Or if the . . .

But I don't understand any of the rest. Can't you put a chrome kitchen (is that the kind of kitchen I mean--a fancy) into an older house? Or a sliding glass door?

Petrea Burchard said...

I prefer the old, Banjo. I'm only trying to come up with an explanation for their actions, not an excuse. There's a 1980's kitchen in our 1924 house. If/when we get the money we'll do our best to restore the 1920s to the place (with convenient appliances, of course).