Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Heroines

"A young Iranian woman named Neda is killed in the streets. Another walks down the street, defiantly showing off her hair and body. And still another woman says she's not scared. 'When they want to hit me, I say hit.'"

... One expert says women protesters are the "new face of Iran."

--CNN

There must be some organizing going on, net-wise, blog-wise. Let me know. How much more powerful to hear millions of indiviudal voices, rather than just a few arguing heads of state.

Didn't the Berlin Wall fall this way?

62 comments:

  1. I know that Twitter has been a huge part of the organization and voice. There was a scheduled outage that was postponed just after the protests began because it was really the only way to get information about what was happening.

    Really an exciting and scary time to be alive.

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  3. A dangerous time. Let's hope Berlin Wall and NOT Tienamen square.

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  4. Jose (JM) in Portugal has a post on his CDPB.

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  5. Here is the link:
    http://oeirasdailyphoto.blogspot.com/2009/06/amir-sadeghi.html

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  6. Ben & Marg, wouldn't it be powerful if every blogger (that agreed in principle) dedicated the same day to thoughts or photos that showed or symbolized their support? It would be a voice, anyway. Better than that, individual voices.

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  7. And there is little that we can do except support them with our thoughts and our voices: it is their internal battle.

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  8. Sorry to bombard you ... but this blog is somehow channelling the Teheran 24 blog where the chap is missing ...

    http://portlanddailyphotos.blogspot.com/

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  9. This made me teary with pride for that woman, and the others like her. It's fascinating to watch them and root them on. I like your idea of a bloggers' day of joined protest.

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  10. I watched Charlie Rose today and his guest, Ivan Seidenberg, Chairman and CEO of Verizon, said that in the end the technology will win. That China and other countries will lose their grip because they won't be able to keep up with the flow and exchange of information and it will happen sooner than we think. I hope that's true. I'll do a day for Iran post.

    I tried tweeting last fall for about two weeks and what a waste of time. To hear what is happening in Iran right now, priceless. Twitter is genius.

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  11. The death of a single person for a great cause eventually gives life to multiples of others - including us.

    How would we behave living outside the US, in a totalitarian state?

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  12. I went to JM's blog and did a post that links to his about the missing CDP blogger.

    wv scrum

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  13. I traced back to the gentleman's blog who was missing and left a message around 5 p.m., and now that blog has been shut down as of 8:30.

    But Pasadena PIO is right, individuals are watching and talking.

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  14. This is still active:

    http://portlanddailyphotos.blogspot.com/

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  15. I know the portland guy. He's been blogging a lot in Farsi and is apparently still being read in Iran, so he's been able to get a lot of information to people over there. Very cool. Very brave.

    Let's keep talking about this because we can do an international blogger day, I know it can happen. I'm going to oerias now.

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  16. For some reason Julie's link didn't work for me. Try this http://oeirasdailyphoto.blogspot.com/
    and scroll to the 6/24/09 entry.

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  17. What about "blog for the Iranian protesters" this weekend, all weekend? Easy to spread the word and plenty of time to do it. I already mentioned it to Jose at Oeiras.

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  18. I'm up for that, Petrea. Surely there's something I could write.
    I'll holler at Devika in India; this type of commentary is right up her alley.

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  19. Good idea. I'm in, P. I like that theme, or some variation thereof: The world is watching. I've seen that comment on many blogs.

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  20. I just found out there's something brewing on the City Daily Photo blog forum. Let me find out what and get back to you. Jose posted my suggestion there but if they decide on something else, there's no harm in doing both.

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  21. I have followed both the forum and Jose and I am up for "something" either Friday, Saturday or Sunday (even AND).

    I have tried to voice my thoughts and feelings more privately on Dancing.

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  22. the world is certainly watching

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  23. I don't know about the Berlin Wall--but it is fantastic that the word--voice--of these courageous women is finally being heard.

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  24. There's a discussion on the City Daily PHoto forum about whether or not to do a worldwide blog day (and when). USElaine has been in contact with human rights organizations. One CDP blogger may have been imprisoned by Iranian police and there's concern that if they figure out who s/he is, they'll be particularly hard on him/her. A New York human rights org told her this:

    "My best advice is since he is not much known insdie Iran, it maybe better for the outside world to keep quiet. If he is detained at a protest, there is a good chance
    interrogators don't know extent of his photography and he may not neccessarily admit to it. Which means he could get released soon if they don't figure out where his
    photos been published but if the outside world makes a lot of noise about him, they would actually pay attention to him among a big crowd of detainees bcs of this outside noise I recommend not to do so now."

    So at this point, whether or not the CDP is going to organize anything is up in the air.

    But that doesn't mean we can't support free speech and human rights in Iran in general. I will make it the subject of my posts this weekend. My theme: green.

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  25. I just have to add something here because my WV is "myhoring."

    It really should be "myboring," but I can dream.

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  26. Yes, this is what I am doing, Petra. Until the mass of people in Iran are either satisfied or forced to stop their mass dissent, I am posting my usual Sydney Eye post plus another indicating my support for self-determination. I am using green as a focus in the photos which I am sourcing on the www.

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  27. I'm using the theme of light and imbedding links. I figure search engines are the equivalent of writing a politician or being a member of the Nielsen family.

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  28. There's beauty in an individual statement. (Julie and PJ have already been inspiring for me.) So I'll tag my posts to say I am watching, and intend to dedicate Saturday to courage and bravery as I watch.

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  29. Hope you don't mind, KB, but I've directed some Aussie and Kiwi renku pals to this commentary who might be seeking information on this initiative. Some Europeans and Yanks, too.
    Who do we know that writes features for the press? Do you think a PSA is neccessary?
    I mean we have a deadline, of sorts. And Petrea mentioned an impending date discussion.
    I love deadlines! Kick it in ggeeaarrr!

    wv: relsh!

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  30. There will be a CDP theme day this weekend to support the people of Iran. I'll keep following the posts on the forum and udpate you. It would be nice to involve as many bloggers as possible.

    I heard a radio report that the struggle is not just on the streets but among Iran's power elite. Trouble's brewing for the ol' "supreme leader." (Oh, now don't blush, you know who you are, SL!) He's apparently turned out to be not really all that supreme.

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  31. bandit, Beth Arnold has posted some stuff at Huffpo:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/beth-arnold

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  32. bells ringing
    all those from this village
    assemble in the square

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  33. Ok, I'll just keep this post up in case anyone wants to exchange further info.

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  34. i've notified a columnist friend at the local paper. Perhaps others with similar contacts could do the same?

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  35. (No criticism here, but:

    I think what some may like about using their blog for support (if they choose to do it at all, many don't) is that it isn't tied to government or media in any way. It's just an individual's voice.)

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  36. Yes her death is tragic

    Some thoughts;

    1. The media is making her an icon for political change in the same way that the student waving a white flag in front of advancing tanks during the Tienanmen square uprising became. Back then Reagan said something to the effect of how brave the young man was and how powerful the image. It's no wonder then that Obama's administration is keeping so quiet considering it's subsequent willingness to completely ignore issues such as human rights in it's desire to secure China's help with the bailout.

    Where money is concerned, icons can be broken and their haunted faces so easily forgotten.

    2. Who knows what's really going on? It's becoming clear that the state media machine is increasingly selling a view of Iran similar to that of Iraq in the build up to the 2nd Iraq war. Let's not forget that there were NO weapons of mass destruction there and that the pretext of going to war was a fiction. A lie. Given our nation's histories of destabilizing other countries for political and economic gain, I trust none of the major players in this one.

    Rigged election? Probably (worked well for Bush). Foreign interference? Probably and kind of naive not to think so ( http://pakalert.wordpress.com/2009/06/18/cia-has-distributed-400-million-dollars-inside-iran-to-evoke-a-revolution/). Tear gassing protesters and even killing them (G8 London) is something all freedom loving democracies are apt to do from time to time.

    3. Where are the icons representing the continual massacre of innocent civilians by coalition forces in Iraq and Afghanistan? Were where the icons from Gaza after the illegal and brutal occupation? Least we forget; Israel broke moral and international law by dropping phosphorus bombs on civilians. But hush, let's not give Iran any crazy ideas that we'll ignore them if they do likewise. Er....!

    Where are these icons and, more importantly, why isn't the media creating them? Mm...

    Truth is always a bloody mess.

    God rest this young woman's soul.

    Now, let's look forward to Hillary Clinton smiling as she cuts the ribbon and makes a brief speech at the opening of a new McDonald's store in downtown Tehran :)

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  37. Michael, I'm glad you commented. Give me some time to chew on this.

    The only thing I can say immediately, is that the Iranians must decide their own government and direction. We are outsiders and bystanders, and will so remain.

    We can voice our concern, however, over the violence that is taking place.

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  38. Damn, Michael, bad timing on my latest blog. It was all in fun, and not pointed at your beautiful photos AT ALL. (It was pointed at me.) But I'm sure you know that.

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  39. I think I'm more involved than usual because I've been in contact with Iranian bloggers. I admit a prejudice. They speak English. I spoke with them. We became friends. I've never spoken to an Afghani blogger or an Iraqui blogger or a Somali blogger. So I admit I'm not objective. I'm talking about my friends here.

    Juy 28th, Sunday, the CDP folks are doing "Blog day: Iran Protests." There are several suggested themes, but it doesn't matter. Speak up, join in if you like. Say what you wish to say. Freedom of speech is partly what this is about.

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  40. @altadenahiker Re: vegetable stuff. Now worries, I enjoy your blog posts and think your attitude to vegetables is unique and special. All power to you comrade :)

    Re: Iran absolutely 100% agree with you. Wonderful work that you and everyone in the blogging community is doing. I think my critical hat is directed at media bais in what is, and what isn't considered, a good cause.

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  41. Michael, I haven't seen your blog--(so many, so little time, ou know)--missed the hiker's vegetable post.

    I think you're smart to wear your cynic's hat where the media is concerned.

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  42. @Petrea You're doing really good and important work. Freedom of speech is under threat in so many places in the world. I'm glad that you read my comment for what it is. The fact that I live in the middle of nowhere and socialize mostly with vegetable life, is a testament to how often what comes out of my mouth isn't exactly what I intended to say. Fortunately, vegetables are a very passive and largely uncritical audience. I say largely because I am uncertain why the strawberries didn't do so well this year. Could it be that they finely had enough of this grumpy middle aged guy bemoaning the state of everything and doing very little to correct it? Mm. I'm beginning to thinks so....:(

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  43. Presumably people's ability in Iran to speak freely is being taken from them. Without that ability political machines can move at will.
    Look at our happy speak media-
    I'll be officially homeless in less than a week, but this comment will disappear in a haze of pomp and distraction. Our media is far more refined and sinister than any in the world. But hey, I knew that-I told my son in '99 that its essentially every man for himself.
    Of course, at the time I didn't realize the country would be sold out from under us.
    Should one believe that a blogger initiative will promote another
    international "police action"?
    Judging from those involved, I think not, unless we'd all be happy
    afterwards to sit back in our easy chairs and send each other virtual pats on the back.
    The American media seems more concerned with the distraction of a state governor's indiscretion than young Neda's bullet wound to the head.
    I don't believe an entire community of diverse blogging enthusiasts is concerned with taking over the world. Rather, quite the opposite.
    The world needs to continue to watch, and not be afraid to open its mouth when foul play is detected, whatever the source.
    Mike, I supported a non-interventionist, anti-imperialist
    anti-lobby money candidate in the last presidential election.
    He got his head handed to him on a plate.
    Since then, those very same supporters have very nearly taken back control of our states second largest political party. We'll probably take the Mayor's election of this city in the fall. All from a grassroots effort based in honesty and disclosure, and carefl analysis of the political game.
    Its in the numbers, man, whose going to stand up.
    pardon me for the length of this speech. I'll not let it happen again.

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  44. Bandit, you're always welcome to say as much and for as long as you like. What's better than discussion? Sorry I can't offer everyone at the table some wine...

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  45. Uhh, damn I type slow; missed five posts.

    Damn, Mike, them is some mighty fine lookin' beans.

    And they taste good, KB!

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  46. I'm not good at politics. I'm too emotional. I stopped at "I'll be officially homeless in less than a week." What happens then, bandit?

    I've been authorized to share this code with you, should anyone want it. If you post it on your blog on Sunday you'll be sharing the page on the City Daily Photo blog that shows the thumbnails for those participating in the Blog for Iran day:
    Click here to view thumbnails for all participants

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  47. I have to go to bed. I'll check for your answer in the morning, bandit. I'll think of you.

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  48. The Iranian women are wonderful and strong and smart. They always were. My college roommate was Iranian and her family made it OK thru the revolution.

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  49. Guys, before you all get too carried away, try to remember one simple thing: Our enemy's enemy is NOT our friend.

    By all likelihood the protesters are not any more pro-US or pro-West than the regime they are protesting. By the faint chance that they win this one, they won't have any trouble turning around and chant "death to America" next.

    The hostility towards the west in the Arab world is deep seated and well founded.

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  50. @Vanda I think that’s an excellent observation.

    @Tash Yes they are. I must remind myself that I live in an affluent country and have the luxury of being able to comment on things without fear of persecution. I take this right for granted. I do not have to fight for it.

    @Bandit Firstly: concerned about “I'll be officially homeless in less than a week” What’s happening? I know we’ve only just made acquaintances via this blogging thing but/and, well…concerned. Secondly: yes granted. The type of coverage depends on where you are and what service you’re getting it from and you’ve got a very point about the numbers. As for the beans; yes this year the beans are doing very well. I have Frank Zappa’s Truck Driver Divorce song stuck in my head though. But that’s not a bad side effect and the beans he sang about were string beans and I don’t have to bust my ass delivering them to Utah

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  51. Howzabout that loney dental floss though, bro?

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  52. Sorry, Michael. You misunderstood my "line in the sand" comment.

    I read our post with increasing disquiet and have to tell you that I disagree with the direction the conversation took after that.

    I need to tell you that I bow out of this conversation.

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  53. Not everyone is going to agree with everything that gets said around here. And that's ok with me. Half of what I've learned and believe, I gathered through argument.

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  54. Sorry for late replies to comments. Only just got to a PC!

    @Bandit Ha! Maybe I should move to Montana? Soon :)

    @Julie Thank you. There's no need to apologise for disagreeing though and I wish everyone on the web was as polite! However, I do apologize to the host of this blog if my contribution has been responsible for your leaving. I'm not sure whether I did or didn't understand your -line in the sand- comment. I guess I’ll never know. Mm. I think we all draw lines in the sand at times. It's a deep metaphor. But the best thing about drawing lines in the sand is that it’s not drawing lines in concrete. Sand is shifting. We don’t have to remain prisoners of our collective histories. Thanks again, Michael.

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  55. @pasadenaadjacent Is protest/lite like a protest-ant? Or is that pun just unforgiveable? Er...sorry.

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