Saturday, February 14, 2009



The sweetest song ever written.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEdCDu3xCrQ

21 comments:

  1. Yes, I can sing this

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  2. What I like is that the woman in the video/portrait is not a size zero. How dulce is that?

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  3. I like Placido. He's a consummate musician.

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  4. No one can sing the same song in the same room with Placido Domingo. He is on an alter all unto himself. Also, who is your photographer? S/He gotcha a good one.

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  5. CB3Dot is correct about no one singing in the same room with Placido (except maybe Carreras, and that's iffy, I saw the three tenors live). I saw him with the LA opera in Madama Butterfly and everyone was singing their hearts out, working hard. They are world-class opera singers. But he walks on stage and just sorta opens his mouth and the place just shakes. There is no comparison.

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  6. Jut beautiful. Thanks
    And you're looking good sistah!
    V

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  7. If I could inhale that song, I would.

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  8. inhale?...a strange choice of word. My pick is Nat King Cole's "Mona Lisa". He died on February 15 (from smoking).

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  9. I have my own ripe picks for sweetest.

    Who's your secret guest blogger covered up in a baseball cap & dark glasses?

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  10. Oh, I want to inhale this song, too. And hold my breath!

    I've never heard him do this song-- now, nobody else will ever compare.

    I love your new picture, oh mighty cool one.

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  11. Karin, I moderate my blog's comments, so I think the trouble you've been having has to do with them not appearing right away? They're both there now.

    I like the new picture.

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  12. I gotta' flog this one just a little more. When the three tenors were on stage together, you saw the magnitude of all their talents, and their limitations. Carreras was the low one on the totem. He always seemed tense, stiff when singing with the others. His high range seemed to have a cap and he could not go beyond it. The tone had not the texture and fluidity of Pavarotti and Domingo. Pavarotti was the monster between the two. You though he could do anything he wished, and he generally did. On occasion he would dial one in, but no matter, it was a good call. His fortes were strong, his pianissimos were accurate, on pitch and he could spin them out forever. He knew how good he was, and he revealed this whenever he opened his mouth. So, what was the real difference between Pavarotti and Domingo? For me, Domingo brough to the party texture, fluidity, and subtlety. There is much more but this will suffice for now. You had the feeling that when he sang, he heard his music as a listener, not a performer. The song was a conversation between a master and his audience. You never had the feeling he was “performing” You never him sweat. He was comfortable in Italian, French, German, English and Russian. In the course of mastering these languages, he was able to create the purest vowels, cleanest consonants, and the most flexible texture in his voice that I ever experienced. Jussi Bjoerling was a tenor of pure voice, and reigned with the tenors of his age from the late 30’s into the 50’s. There was many of his time, top tier and brought decades of great performances to opera. None, for me, reached that pinnacle that is now held, unchallenged by Placido Domingo.

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  13. Sometimes, in my weaker moments and after many cocktails, I think you're rather brilliant.

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  14. May I join you in the flogging, Chris?

    Carreras was always more famous for his passionate acting than his singing. He had a major career setback when he got leukemia and wasn't expected to live. He organized the first Three Tenors concert as a benefit for his leukemia foundation, and the concert(s) had the side effect of making him more famous than he ever had been before. He had always been good-- world class, even -- but he wasn't a Pavarotti or a Domingo.

    Pavarotti's gift, in my opinion, was something unexplainable, remarkable. He was a monster, he could do anything, as you say. He was like a big baby out there on the stage with the other two, and they let him show off because the crowds loved him. His voice could make you cry with the beauty of it. But it was only the voice; he didn't seem to have the emotional intelligence behind it, the passion of an actor.

    Domingo, though, if we're comparing the three (and I don't have enough knowledge of opera to compare others), Domingo has it all: the acting, the singing, and the intelligence. He combines all three with great grace. He is a pleasure to watch and to listen to, and his love for his art shines through every note.

    So yeah. I'm adding my flogging to your flogging and we flogging agree.

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  15. Hmm, I'll read P's post after my evening cocktail. Of course, as Chris will tell you, I'm at a disadvantage. My favorite tenor was recently convicted of rape (no fooling).

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  16. P!
    I think I have a new soul mate. The little hiker doesn't like to read long tomes, and I don't do a lotta' short, pyrric, prose. But, you can hang with the best of us. We do Dreiser, Tolstoy, Michner, and will as soon sit through 6 hours of Wagner,as a short cantata. You now have a special LARGE space in my LARGE heart!

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  17. Sorry, I got carried away.

    Mr. Dot (or should I say C!), I can't wax poetic on any of the authors you mentioned, nor am I familiar enough with Wagner to shoot my mouth off. But never fear, there will be another subject that gets me going. And I'm happy to have as many soul mates as I can get.

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  18. The tenor of which I spoke was Tito Beltran, a cute as a button Chilean who was convicted last year. Beware those who are buttonly cute. I don't know what I'll do with his CD now, but never play it springs to mind. And P, I agree, Michner is no author worthy of repute, but I'll be you are on speaking terms with Tolstoy.

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  19. Nope. Seriously. I haven't read those authors--maybe Dreiser, long ago. Talk Shakespeare to me and I'll talk back, but otherwise I'm a cretin. I got over-fed on classics in high school and college, and I rebelled. I've been reading modern novelists. I read Thackeray and Fielding in my thirties but didn't get to Austen or Dickens until my forties. I guess if I'm gonna read Tolstoy I'd better get to it.

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